#UKSnowDepth

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The snow in the UK has really kicked in this week and many, many schools are closed – I thought we could take the opportunity to create some learning resources related to the conditions.

I discovered this list of snow depths but then thought perhaps we could simply crowd-source some accurate data from colleagues across the UK adding their own personal measurements. Collaborating on a map would also provide us the location too.

Here is the map so far – use the link below the map to add your own measurements.


View #UKSnowDepth in a larger map

I expect there are a great many different ways we could use this data (and this snowy experience) when we get back to classes. Here are a few thoughts of mine:

  • Create simple graphs and chart to represent the data. Answer questions to interpret the information.
  • Develop your own map for the snow depth on your school site, taking measurements in different locations. Explore the conditions that might have brought about the highest depth.
  • Gather information from other countries in Europe that have been effected.
  • Make comparisons to countries that have a constant or more regular snowfall.
  • Cross reference the snow depths to the temperatures – repeat for other countries.
  • Design a snow depth instrument.
  • Learn about the depth of snow during expeditions to Everest or the Poles.
  • Read historic accounts of expeditions and references to snow depth.
  • Learn about different types of snow and how it changes under different temperatures and conditions.
  • Explore freezing and melting.
  • Look at insulation and conduct an investigation about keeping something cold or hot.

What ideas do you have for back-to-school-after-the-snow days – leave a comment with your thoughts.

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  • http://qmsconsultants.com/NABH.html NABH

    I really appreciate your post and you explain each and every point very well.Thanks for sharing this information.And I’ll love to read your next post too.
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    Excellent article! thank you enormous for new ideas and new undertaking. Well that it is possible using modern technologies to think of what that new employments and fascinations for people! Also collection of information about snow and snow-cover will help future generations.

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  • http://twitter.com/IaninSheffield Ian Guest

    Tom, thanks once again for the inspiration, which as usual I’ve shamelessly poached and tweaked a little for our school. It’s been a really interesting exercise to see whether our community would give it a try, both from the data input and from subsequent usage – we shall see! (http://wp.me/pEZyh-96)

    Can I offer another possible use for languages teachers perhaps – number practice? Display the map on a large screen and pupils have to click on a flake and respond to “Quelle est la prof ondeur de la neige” for example. [That's 'how deep is the snow' as Google Translate sees it and no, I'm not a languages teacher. Does it show?]

  • http://twitter.com/IaninSheffield Ian Guest

    Tom, thanks once again for the inspiration, which as usual I’ve shamelessly poached and tweaked a little for our school. It’s been a really interesting exercise to see whether our community would give it a try, both from the data input and from subsequent usage – we shall see! (http://wp.me/pEZyh-96)

    Can I offer another possible use for languages teachers perhaps – number practice? Display the map on a large screen and pupils have to click on a flake and respond to “Quelle est la prof ondeur de la neige” for example. [That's 'how deep is the snow' as Google Translate sees it and no, I'm not a languages teacher. Does it show?]

  • @Cshively

    Write a numerical snow poem with a line about each depth-similar to the Acrostic poems with a line for each letter of the alphabet:

    2 I await more to roll a snowball

    30 Heavy tired arms and a shovel

    etc.

    Enjoy! We have not had our first snowfall yet in PA, USA
    @cshively @teachersfirst

  • Anonymous

    Hi Robert – pleased to hear you find the idea useful I am pretty sure there
    are plenty of ways we could use the information. Good luck with your lesson
    I hope that it goes well – I am sure you will be great!

  • Anonymous

    Great idea with the #uksnow map Tom. The ideas are really great and I could see them working really inspiring classes and creating some highly motivated learning. I may have an observed lesson next week (it was meant to be Wed this week). Your ideas have inspired me to think about using some Snow maths.
    Thanks, as ever, for sharing your knowledge and ideas.